Destroy the Picture. Create the Object.

Alberto Burri, Combustione plastica (Plastic Combustion), 1958, Plastic, acrylic, burns on canvas. Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Alberto Burri, Combustione plastica (Plastic Combustion), 1958, Plastic, acrylic, burns on canvas.

Painting is something I rarely think about, or rather is an area of art production that I admire from a distance; having little interest in the issues that most commonly dominate its discussion – image, representation, flatness, etc. This is a gross oversimplification and no doubt a sign of medium narrow-mindedness on my part, but having admitted it all the same, you might understand my surprise at being FLOORED by a painting exhibition this past week (so floored, in fact, I visited it three times in five days).

The exhibition in question was Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void, 1949-1962, the last show Paul Schimmel organized for the embattled Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, now on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Bringing together American, European, and Japanese artists, Destroy the Picture, as its title suggests, focuses on the literal and conceptual assault of the picture plane in postwar art, and suggests this formal turn was very much a psychological, existential response to a world drastically altered by the events of WWII. As Schimmel writes in his catalogue essay, “Destruction was in a dialectical relationship with creation, and the void was a space of potentiality. From the embers of destruction of the picture plane emerged a medium reborn that powerfully registered the complex experience of living in a world perched on the brink of self-annihilation.”¹ Continue reading “Destroy the Picture. Create the Object.”

Site without specificity – Picasso and Chicago

Pablo Picasso, Untitled ("The Picasso"), dedicated 1967, Core ten steel, 50 ft. high, Daley Plaza, Chicago
Pablo Picasso, Untitled (“The Picasso”), dedicated 1967, Core ten steel, 50 ft. high, Daley Plaza, Chicago
Photograph taken by author, 27 March 2013

I promise this is not a blog solely about public sculpture, though I do find it interesting that I both feel the need to express that caveat and have been thinking about ‘public things’ a lot lately. Once you start looking for them, you realize these encumbered objects are everywhere, and while they take on tremendous collective significance they often remain invisible. It is a weird experience to regularly walk by a 50ft. hunk of steel and not ‘see’ it. This week, however, a visit to the Art Institute of Chicago and its new exhibition, Picasso and Chicago, made me acutely aware of the dissonance between sculpture’s visible and invisible nature, especially in regards to its always complex connection to site. Continue reading “Site without specificity – Picasso and Chicago”